nebulasnovasandnightsky:

look if you unironically say ‘money can’t buy happiness’ then either you’ve never faced a real financial struggle or you’ve achieved enlightenment, because goddamn does financial security feel an awful lot like happiness when it’s something you’re not used to

youtubersandsoup:

This Vine is Just Perfection

in-the-land-of-gods-and-monsters:

Endless List of favorite characters:

Jessica Chastain as Celia Foote-The Help

You know what I’d do if I were you? I’d give it right back to him. I’d hit him over the head with a skillet and I’d tell him to go straight to hell.

xiumania:

im so glad fanfiction sometimes looks like those basic formatted websites u read for deeply detailed paragraphs on educational subjects

my dad just walked into my room and saw words on my computer and was like “oh ur studying sorry” when i was actually reading about two boys fucking in a storage room on a cruise ship

top 10 favorite chick flick comedies (2000s)

thatwetshirt:

Sixteen Candles (1984)

When you don’t have anything, you don’t have anything to lose. Right?

lilacid:

niggaqueef:

when you sat in a weird position for a long time and you move and then your foot feels like this

image

most accurate description of anything accurate ever in the history of accuracy

Before John Green, his general category of realistic (non-fantasy) YA was rife with teen angst and “issues” fiction that you might have associated with the legendary Judy Blume, or with newer writers like Sarah Dessen or Laurie Halse Anderson. Anderson’s classic 1999 novel Speak, about a high schooler struggling to deal with the aftermath of sexual assault, was so influential that three years later Penguin launched an entire imprint named after it. One of the books launched under the behest of Speak was Green’s Looking for Alaska. But it’s Green whose name you’re more likely to know today, not Anderson’s, although Anderson has won more awards and written more books.

On Twitter, Green has 2 million followers. Compared to the rest of the leaders in Young Adult fiction, that number is staggering. To approach even half the Twitter influence of John Green all by himself, you need an entire army of YA women. Anderson, Blume, Dessen, Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Richelle Mead, Margaret Stohl, Kami Garcia, Rainbow Rowell, Maureen Johnson, Malinda Lo, Holly Black, LJ Smith, Ellen Hopkins, Shannon Hale, Lauren Myracle, Libba Bray, Melissa Marr, and Leigh Bardugo: As a group these women only have about 1.2 million followers on Twitter. That’s the voice of one man outweighing several decades of women who have had major successes, critical acclaim, and cultural influence.